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Our blog highlights our music performances at wedding ceremonies and receptions, and corporate, private and charity/special events in Toronto, GTA, Etobicoke, Montreal, Montebello, Ottawa, Banff, Calgary, Canmore, Caledon, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Halifax, Vancouver, Victoria, Niagara, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Hamilton, London, Kitchener-Waterloo, Cambridge, Burlington, Oakville, Owen Sound, Mississauga, Meaford, Caledon, Collingwood, Saskatoon, Peterborough, Whitby, Vaughan, Woodbridge, and in many other cities across Canada.

We also offer advice on choosing music for your wedding ceremony or special event, and have a large and ever growing list of classical and popular music.

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How to choose wedding music: the postlude following the ceremony

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0 0 1 164 938 Duo d'Amore (violin & cello) 7 2 1100 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE

 Like the prelude before the ceremony, the postlude is really not a part of the ceremony, but it is still useful to mention this portion as it is a great spot to have music. The postlude follows the loud and happy recessional. Sometimes all of the guests have exited (if the wedding is particularly small) and other times there is an opportunity to play music for 5-10 minutes following the ceremony (especially if there is a Champagne toast or pictures.)

 

If there are no pictures or toast following the ceremony, Duo d’Amore would be happy to choose an additional song to keep the mood upbeat, and this is how 90% of the music for the postlude gets chosen. In all likelihood, it is so loud that the music can not be heard by everyone, and the guests are also walking away from the musicians. In other cases the bride and groom may have more songs that they would like to incorporate into the ceremony and prelude, but for time constraints or other reasons they did not get performed. In this instance we would play one or two songs, again to keep the mood light and happy. So there are lots of options!